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Special event
A CINÉMAGIQUE presentation
Today  6:30pm
Cinémagique présente FOXTROT (STA)
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Michael and Dafna are devastated when army officials show up at their home to announce the death of their son Jonathan. While his sedated wife rests, Michael spirals into a whirlwind of anger only to experience one of life’s unfathomable twists, which rival the surreal military experiences of his son.
Special event
Post screening discussion and Q&A with the film's director
18 March 2018  19:00
Les faux tatouages (STA)
An entire first love, set to a punk soundtrack. Everything goes faster when you’re not 20 yet! Théo celebrates his 18th birthday by getting drunk on beer and angry rock. He meets Mag, a charismatic young rebel. It might be love, but Théo has to leave Montreal soon for a new life far away. For this second feature, Pascal Plante captures adolescent turmoil on the margins. A sensitive slice of life with plenty of character.
Pascal Plante
Song of the Sea

By Tomm Moore

From the creators of the Academy Award®-nominated The Secret of Kells comes a breathtakingly gorgeous, hand-drawn masterpiece. Based on the Irish legend of the Selkies, Song of the Sea tells the story of the last seal-child, Saoirse, and her brother Ben, who go on an epic journey to save the world of magic and discover the secrets of their past. Pursued by the owl witch Macha and a host of ancient and mythical creatures, Saoirse and Ben race against time to awaken Saoirse’s powers and keep the spirit world from disappearing forever. As enthralling for adults as it is for children young and old, Song of the Sea is a wonder of magical storytelling and visual splendor that is destined to become a classic.


- The New York Post

- Los Angeles Times

- IndieWire
Tomm Moore
Tehran Taboo (STA)
In this gorgeously animated drama, the lives of several strong-willed women and a young musician intersect. Their stories reveal the hypocrisies of modern Iranian society, where sex, drugs, and corruption coexist with strict religious law. In the bustling metropolis of Tehran, avoiding prohibitions has become an everyday sport and breaking taboos can be a means of personal emancipation. Nevertheless, women invariably end up on the bottom rung of the social order. A young woman needs an operation to "restore" her virginity. A judge in the Islamic Revolutionary Court exhorts favors from a prostitute in exchange for a favorable ruling. The wife of an imprisoned drug addict is denied the divorce she needs in order to live independently. Making use of rotoscope animation, expat Iranian filmmaker Ali Soozandeh creates a portrait of contemporary Tehran that would be impossible by any other means.
Ali Soozandeh
Fargo (STF)
In collaboration with Film Noir au Canal

"FARGO is a crime tale in which somebody's foot is seen sticking out of a wood chipper. And the Coens can present that image so that its salient feature is the victim's white sock." - The New York Times

Jerry Lundegaard is a car salesman in Minneapolis who has landed himself deep into debt. Desperate for money, he hires two inept crooks to kidnap his own wife in the hope that her wealthy father will pay the ransom, giving him enough cash to pay off his associates and clear his debts. But Jerry's plan goes horribly wrong when the thugs kill a highway patrolman and two innocent bystanders, and the murders fall under the jurisdiction of Marge Gunderson; a pregnant but persistent police chief in rural Minnesota who starts to unravel the deadly scheme.

The Coens are at their clever best with this snowbound film noir, a crazily mundane crime story set in their native Midwest. Purportedly based on real events, it brings them as close as they may ever come -- not very -- to everyday life and ordinary people. Perversely, the frozen north even brings out some uncharacteristic warmth in these coolly cerebral film makers, although anyone seeking the milk of human kindness would be well advised to look elsewhere. The Coens' outlook remains as jaundiced as it was in "Blood Simple," the razor-sharp 1984 debut feature that the much more stylish and entertaining "Fargo" brings to mind. - The New York Times

FARGO is not only the Coen brothers' best film; it's also their funniest and their most accessible, one to find a place in the hearts even of those who usually find their obliqueness and understated whimsy hard to love. - The Telegraph
Joel Coen
Insyriated (STA)
Damascus. The war is on the street. The apartment has become a sort of bunker where everything is organised depending on poverty. Every day is just a struggle to survive until tomorrow. The men are gone, only the women and the elderly are left. But some other men appear. Everyone retreats to the kitchen. Everyone except one young woman, alone on the other side of the door.
Philippe Van Leeuw
Faute d\'amour (STF)

Boris and Zhenya are going through a divorce. Arguing constantly, and in the process of selling their apartment, they are already preparing for their new lives: Boris with his younger, pregnant girlfriend and Zhenya with the wealthy lover who is keen to get married. Neither seems interested in their 12-year-old son Alyosha. Until he disappears.
Andrei Zviaguintsev
A Fantastic Woman (STA)

Marina and Orlando are in love and planning for the future. Marina is a young waitress and aspiring singer. Orlando is 20 years older than her, and owns a printing company. After celebrating Marina's birthday one evening, Orlando falls seriously ill. Marina rushes him to the emergency room, but he passes away just after arriving at the hospital. Instead of being able to mourn her lover, suddenly Marina is treated with suspicion. The doctors and Orlando's family don't trust her. A woman detective investigates Marina to see if she was involved in his death. Orlando's ex-wife forbids her from attending the funeral. And to make matters worse, Orlando's son threatens to throw Marina out of the flat she shared with Orlando. Marina is a trans woman and for most of Orlando's family, her sexual identity is an aberration, a perversion. So Marina struggles for the right to be herself. She battles the very same forces that she has spent a lifetime fighting just to become the woman she is now - a complex, strong, forthright and fantastic woman.
Sebastian Lelio
Phantom Thread (STF)

Set in the glamour of 1950's post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutants and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock's life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love.

With his latest film, Paul Thomas Anderson paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey, and the women who keep his world running. PHANTOM THREAD is Paul Thomas Anderson's eighth movie, and his second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis.
Paul Thomas Anderson
The Shape of Water (STF)

At the height of the Cold War, circa 1962, two workers in a high-tech US government laboratory (Sally Hawkins and Oscar winner Octavia Spencer) discover a terrifying secret experiment, in this otherworldly fairytale from Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth).

"Well, the first thing is that I love monsters. I identify with monsters."

No filmmaker has plumbed the soul of screen monsters with more fire and empathy than Guillermo del Toro. The master behind Pan's Labyrinth, Hellboy, and Pacific Rim has long shown a deep understanding of what monsters mean to us, and why we need them. THE SHAPE OF WATER is his strongest expression yet of the shivering appeal of monsters, and the unsettling notion that the monstrous can be revealed in many forms.

In 1963, Elisa (Sally Hawkins) works as a janitor at a US government laboratory. One night, a strange, amphibious creature (del Toro regular Doug Jones) is wrangled into the facility. Elisa is more fascinated than frightened. What scares her more is the threat posed by the federal agent in charge (Michael Shannon, also appearing at this year's Festival in The Current War). Cruel and self-serving, he seems convinced the surest way to handle the mysterious creature is to kill it. With the help of her neighbor Giles (Richard Jenkins), her co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer), and a sympathetic scientist (Michael Stuhlbarg), Elisa hatches a plan to save the creature's life, at the risk of her own.

Strange marvels abound in THE SHAPE OF WATER. Marshalling these remarkable performances together with stunning production design, fluid camerawork, and Alexandre Desplat's gorgeous score, del Toro delivers unforgettable film poetry. Movie fans will luxuriate in the wealth of references to classic monster movies and mid-century thrillers. Some will note the film's layered subtexts of social critique. But none of that is necessary to enjoy the pure pleasure of watching a master filmmaker working at the height of his powers, exploring the world he most loves.
Guillermo Del Toro