NOW PLAYING

 
 
Tap the posters to see the details of the film
Special event
Post screening discussion and Q&A with the film's director
21 January 2018  19:30
Destierros (STA)
Screenings of this film will be preceded by the short film LE DERNIER JOUR by Frédéric St-Hilaire through the Plein(s) Écran(s) short film series.

An immersive journey with South American migrants who walk, ride freight trains and trek through the forest, travelling from shelter to shelter, all with the goal of reaching the U.S. border. Destierros is an unforgettable human odyssey that captures a reality that’s particularly difficult to document without resorting to sensationalism. Using his camera as an active observer, Hubert Caron-Guay (co-director of L’état du monde, RIDM 2012) alternates between purely sensory sequences and revealing testimonials. The approach allows the film to create sufficient distance to capture the violent intensity of interminable, uncertain exile while immortalizing the heartbreaking stories of men and women haunted by the past and aware that this trip is their last chance for a better life.
Hubert Caron Guay
 
Phantom Thread (STF)
No vouchers accepted before January 25

Set in the glamour of 1950's post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutants and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock's life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love.

With his latest film, Paul Thomas Anderson paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey, and the women who keep his world running. PHANTOM THREAD is Paul Thomas Anderson's eighth movie, and his second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis.
Paul Thomas Anderson
 
RIGOLETTO
The corruption of innocence is at the heart of Verdi’s potent tragedy in David McVicar’s production for The Royal Opera. Rigoletto, court jester to the libertine Duke of Mantua, is cursed by the father of one of the Duke’s victims for his irreverent laughter. When the Duke seduces Rigoletto’s daughter Gilda, it seems the curse is taking effect…

David McVicar’s production highlights the cruelty at the heart of the court of Mantua. Richly dressed courtiers engage in orgies and revelries to Verdi’s heady, spirited dances. The opera’s many musical highlights include the ebullient ‘La donna è mobile’, in which the Duke boasts of his disregard for women; Gilda’s exquisite, plangent duets with Rigoletto and the Duke; and the gorgeous Act III quartet that beautifully weaves the voices together as the story quickens to its shattering conclusion.

Giuseppe Verdi wrote in 1855 that Rigoletto was his ‘best opera’. He had had to overcome state censorship to stage it – the censors objected to its depiction of an immoral ruler – but he was vindicated by the premiere’s huge success in 1851. Rigoletto was performed 250 times in the next 10 years and has remained one of the most popular of all operas.
 
Big Time
The puckish Danish architect Bjarke Ingels has built his career on defying convention and distancing himself from his peers. He is 39 years old, founder of a company pretentiously and provocatively called BIG and is on his definite way to becoming one of the world's most innovative and successful contemporary architects. According to The Wall Street Journal he has 'rapidly become one of the design world's biggest stars'. Bjarke Ingels' ambitions are extremely high. He wants to build the most significant and memorable building of his era. Even though he is currently building a spectacular skyscraper in New York he longs to design a building that can truly be considered as one of the great buildings in the world--a building that will shape the future of architecture. Nothing less. Nothing is impossible.

"It’s only appropriate that Bjarke Ingels named his architectural group BIG. After all, this is the guy who learned at the foot of the legendary Rem Koolhaas, charted his “Yes is More” manifesto on a giant, 130-metre long carbon strip and gives TED talks on “hedonistic sustainability”. Big, however, means much more than scale. It means an expanded role for architects, who must think beyond the creation of buildings and embrace the challenge of designing sustainable, participatory ecosystems."

See his conference at C2 Montréal HERE
Kaspar Astrup Schroder
 
The Sacrifice (STA)
Famed Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky's final masterpiece, The Sacrifice is a haunting vision of a world threatened with nuclear annihilation that inspired Andrew Sarris (The Village Voice) to proclaim, "You may find yourself moved as you have never been moved before."

As a wealthy Swedish family celebrates the birthday of their patriarch Alexander (Erland Josephson, Cries and Whispers), news of the outbreak of World War III reaches their remote Baltic island — and the happy mood turns to horror. The family descends into a state of psychological devastation, brilliantly evoked by Tarkovsky's arresting palette of luminous greys washing over the bleak landscape around their home. (The film's masterful cinematography is by Sven Nykvist, Ingmar Bergman's longtime collaborator).

For Alexander, a philosopher troubled about man's lack of spirituality, the prospect of certain extinction compels the ultimate sacrifice, and he enters into a Faustian bargain with God to save his loved ones from the fear which grips them. The director's last film, made as he was dying of cancer, The Sacrifice is Tarkovsky's personal statement, a profoundly moving, redemptive tragedy steeped in unforgettable imagery and heart-wrenching emotion.
Andreï Tarkovski
 
Call me by your name (STA)
The latest from Italian auteur Luca Guadagnino ( I Am Love, A Bigger Splash) explores the tender, tentative relationship that blooms over the course of one summer between a 17-year-old boy on the cusp of adulthood (Timothée Chalamet) and his father's research assistant (Armie Hammer).

Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash) has fashioned André Aciman's 2007 novel of sexual awakening into a joyous romantic adventure. Set in the sun-kissed landscape of Lombardy, Northern Italy, and with a script by James Ivory, CALL MY BY YOUR NAME is a note-perfect tale of forbidden love. It brings together Timothée Chalamet (also at the Festival in Hostiles) and Armie Hammer as the two protagonists whose summer in the countryside opens new doors for both of them.

Guadagnino's camera presides languidly over the rambling villa used as a vacation home by American professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and his family. Each summer, the professor invites a doctoral student to visit and help with his research. When hunky 24-year-old Oliver (Hammer) shows up, Perlman's 17-year-old son, Elio (Chalamet) is initially cool and distant. After all, he has a beautiful girlfriend who takes up most of his emotional time. Cast inadvertently into playing the role of good host, squiring fellow American Oliver around town and country, Elio finds himself confounded by a growing physical attraction to the visitor. Their courtship is tentative and awkward, consisting of looks and glances, touches and caresses. Elio's parents look on, blissfully unaware of the heated passions that are boiling beneath the surface.

CALL MY BY YOUR NAME is, above all, a kind of reverie amidst a golden summer of bike rides, swimming holes, and outdoor dinners. Its lush sensuality casts a very special spell that is impossible to resist.
 
The Shape of Water (STF)
Guillermo Del Toro - Best director at the Golden Globes!

At the height of the Cold War, circa 1962, two workers in a high-tech US government laboratory (Sally Hawkins and Oscar winner Octavia Spencer) discover a terrifying secret experiment, in this otherworldly fairytale from Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth).

"Well, the first thing is that I love monsters. I identify with monsters."

No filmmaker has plumbed the soul of screen monsters with more fire and empathy than Guillermo del Toro. The master behind Pan's Labyrinth, Hellboy, and Pacific Rim has long shown a deep understanding of what monsters mean to us, and why we need them. THE SHAPE OF WATER is his strongest expression yet of the shivering appeal of monsters, and the unsettling notion that the monstrous can be revealed in many forms.

In 1963, Elisa (Sally Hawkins) works as a janitor at a US government laboratory. One night, a strange, amphibious creature (del Toro regular Doug Jones) is wrangled into the facility. Elisa is more fascinated than frightened. What scares her more is the threat posed by the federal agent in charge (Michael Shannon, also appearing at this year's Festival in The Current War). Cruel and self-serving, he seems convinced the surest way to handle the mysterious creature is to kill it. With the help of her neighbor Giles (Richard Jenkins), her co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer), and a sympathetic scientist (Michael Stuhlbarg), Elisa hatches a plan to save the creature's life, at the risk of her own.

Strange marvels abound in THE SHAPE OF WATER. Marshalling these remarkable performances together with stunning production design, fluid camerawork, and Alexandre Desplat's gorgeous score, del Toro delivers unforgettable film poetry. Movie fans will luxuriate in the wealth of references to classic monster movies and mid-century thrillers. Some will note the film's layered subtexts of social critique. But none of that is necessary to enjoy the pure pleasure of watching a master filmmaker working at the height of his powers, exploring the world he most loves.
Guillermo Del Toro
 
Call me by your name (STF)
The latest from Italian auteur Luca Guadagnino ( I Am Love, A Bigger Splash) explores the tender, tentative relationship that blooms over the course of one summer between a 17-year-old boy on the cusp of adulthood (Timothée Chalamet) and his father's research assistant (Armie Hammer).

Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash) has fashioned André Aciman's 2007 novel of sexual awakening into a joyous romantic adventure. Set in the sun-kissed landscape of Lombardy, Northern Italy, and with a script by James Ivory, CALL MY BY YOUR NAME is a note-perfect tale of forbidden love. It brings together Timothée Chalamet (also at the Festival in Hostiles) and Armie Hammer as the two protagonists whose summer in the countryside opens new doors for both of them.

Guadagnino's camera presides languidly over the rambling villa used as a vacation home by American professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and his family. Each summer, the professor invites a doctoral student to visit and help with his research. When hunky 24-year-old Oliver (Hammer) shows up, Perlman's 17-year-old son, Elio (Chalamet) is initially cool and distant. After all, he has a beautiful girlfriend who takes up most of his emotional time. Cast inadvertently into playing the role of good host, squiring fellow American Oliver around town and country, Elio finds himself confounded by a growing physical attraction to the visitor. Their courtship is tentative and awkward, consisting of looks and glances, touches and caresses. Elio's parents look on, blissfully unaware of the heated passions that are boiling beneath the surface.

CALL MY BY YOUR NAME is, above all, a kind of reverie amidst a golden summer of bike rides, swimming holes, and outdoor dinners. Its lush sensuality casts a very special spell that is impossible to resist.
Luca Guadagnino
 
THE FLORIDA PROJECT (STF)
The Florida Project tells the story of a precocious six year-old and her ragtag group of friends whose summer break is filled with childhood wonder, possibility and a sense of adventure while the adults around them struggle with hard times.
Sean Baker
 
The Disaster Artist (STF)
James Franco - Best actor (Comedy or Musical) at the Golden Globes!

Since its release in 2003, The Room has captivated cult audiences on the midnight movie circuit with its discombobulated plot, discordant performances, and inexplicable dialogue. Every facet of the film baffles (and beguiles), none more so than the uncanny yet magnetic presence of its eccentric creator and star, Tommy Wiseau, inhabited magnificently in The Disaster Artist by director and star James Franco.

Drawing on the memoir of the same name, Franco chronicles the making of The Room as recalled by Wiseau's friend and reluctant co-star Greg Sestero (played, in a flourish of inspired casting, by Franco's brother Dave). Co-producer and frequent Franco collaborator Seth Rogen plays the foil as the bizarre Wiseau's incredulous script supervisor; also on hand is a cavalcade of surprise comedians and celebrities (no spoilers!), many of whom participate in pitch-perfect recreations of Wiseau's singular vision.

What could have been a mean-spirited mockery of one would-be artist's reach exceeding his grasp instead becomes an empathetic character study that is guaranteed to tear Midnight audiences apart! with uproarious laughter. It is a brilliant comedic portrayal of a Hollywood outsider by a Hollywood insider whose own artistic pursuits have consistently defied easy categorization — and the most sincere veneration of a Z-grade auteur since Tim Burton's Ed Wood.