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From October 19 2018
To October 25 2018
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When Carrigan Crittenden discovers the haunted house she has inherited may contain hidden treasure she calls in a specialist to exercise the ghosts wreaking havoc on the empty mansion. Moving in with with his daughter, Dr James Harvey sets to work on ridding the house of the ghouls only to discover one of them is not as horrible as they thought. Unlike his ghastly uncles - Stretch, Fatso and Stinkie – who hate humans, Casper is a friendly ghost seeking companionship and someone to help him over to the other side. A popular animation on its release in the 90s, this is a feel-good haunted house comedy with just enough scares. ''Like "The Flintstones" and "The Addams Family," "Casper" is an attempt to bring cartoons to life while incorporating them with real actors and sets. As a technical achievement, it's impressive, and entertaining. And there is even a little winsome philosophy, as when Casper sadly tells Kat, "I guess when you're a ghost, life just doesn't matter that much anymore."'' -rogerebert

''...with its lively pace, smashing visual tricks and one of the cutest heroes on screen, it is an engaging fantasy for very small children.'' -New York Times

FOR WHICH AUDIENCE
Ghosts in the movie, although funny, can be scary for younger viewers. We recommend it for 8 years old and up.

GOOD REASONS TO SEE THE MOVIE
For the relationship beetween Kat and Casper
For the good-natured humor
Brad Silberling
 
Accompanied by her 12 year-old daughter Regan, actress Chris McNeil relocates to Washington D.C. where she is filming a movie. Mother and daughter have a good relationship but after a time Regan begins to act strangely. She undergoes various neurological tests but doctors can find nothing to explain her behavior. As Regan's situation reaches crisis proportions - she has to be tied to her bed, swears like a sailor and speaks in tongues - Chris turns to Father Karras, a Roman Catholic priest and psychiatrist to see if an exorcism might be the solution to their problem. Karras is incredulous but the church eventually agrees calling in Father Merrin, who has previously conducted an exorcism and come face to face with the devil.

« The movie that launched a new era in horror films, and which, for one generation, remains one of the scariest experiences of their lives. » -New York Daily News

« William Friedkin’s film of William Peter Blatty’s novel The Exorcist is an expert telling of a supernatural horror story. The well cast film makes credible in powerful laymen’s terms the rare phenomenon of diabolic possession. » -Variety
William Friedkin
 
Drawn from a never-before-seen cache of personal footage spanning decades, this is an intimate portrait of the Sri Lankan artist and musician who continues to shatter conventions. As a raw document of Arulpragasm’s life it’s a treasure trove of intimate insights.
Steve Loveridge
 
Starting six months before the 2016 presidential election, director Jim Stern put his life on hold and — driven to understand what seemed incomprehensible at the time — traveled through red states to interview and spend time with Donald Trump supporters from different backgrounds. It was a search for insights and answers, for anything that could explain the billionaire’s surging appeal and why these voters remained untroubled by so many troubling things the candidate had said and done.

This journey became his Heart of Darkness into the American body politic at a profoundly critical point in our history. And the film he returned with, AMERICAN CHAOS, sheds unique light on difficult issues roiling the nation — chronicling a cultural divide, still dangerously misunderstood, that continues to tear at the fabric of our democracy.
James D. Stern
 
Screenings of the film will be preceded by the short film Le Silence fait peur aux brutes as part of the Plein(s) Écran(s) en salle film series.

The artistic journey of Chilly Gonzales from Canada to the Berlin scene of the late 90s' and finally to philharmonies worldwide. The Grammy-winning eccentric inspired and collaborated with the likes of Daft Punk, Drake, Feist, Jarvis Cocker and Peaches. Crisscrossing between rap, electro and chamber music, Chilly Gonzales is the outrageous entertainer who invited himself into the ivory tower of classical music.
Philipp Jedicke
 
Fahrenheit 11/9
Palme d’Or–winning documentarian Michael Moore (Fahrenheit 9/11) turns his attention to another significant date, examining the legacy of Trump’s ascension to the US presidency on November 9, 2016.

In July 2016, Michael Moore was treated like a crackpot doomsayer for writing the essay "5 Reasons Why Trump Will Win." His prediction was the opposite of most pollsters and pundits but it came true in the wee hours of November 9, 2016 when the electoral college votes were tallied.

Now Moore brings his sharp satire to analyze the legacy of 11/9 and to raise questions about what lies ahead. Trump is a master distractor with his incendiary tweets, staff firings, and outright lies. But within the chaos, his administration has delivered on a right-wing agenda with tax cuts for the wealthy, environmental deregulation, court appointments, and treaty withdrawals that will be felt long into the future.

In Moore's three decades of filmmaking, he's often voiced progressive ideas that sound radical at first but eventually become mainstream. His most famous work, Fahrenheit 9/11 — named for another infamous date — decried the US's war in Iraq long before it became widely derided. A similar dynamic runs through Roger & Me on America's loss of industry, Bowling for Columbine on gun control, and Sicko on health care.

Moore likes to subvert expectations, so we'll refrain from disclosing too many details of Fahrenheit 11/9. Let's just say there are aspects that feel very timely in the lead-up to the US Congressional elections. But overall, this is an evergreen film that applies historical lessons from both progressive and repressive movements. It speaks strongly to a younger generation in the hope that they might fix what the previous generation has royally fucked up.
Michael Moore